Top photo is of the shelves I keep in the living room, middle photo is of the shelves I keep in the bedroom, and the bottom photo is a close up of the top three shelves of the bedroom lot (: I expect I’ll be needing more shelves soon, but for now it all looks quite neat and organised!

(Source: yourcoffeeguru)

thirliewhirl:

girls who were bullied most of their life and gain confidence at one point should be feared most because they dont take anyone’s shit no longer and they will destroy you if you think otherwise

(via pie-and-demon-blood)

kingsleyyy:

this hedgehog is cheering for u bc u can do anything image

(via valar-morghuls)

Tags: Yes you can!

thebookguru:

Sign outside Waterstones Gower Street

thebookguru:

Sign outside Waterstones Gower Street

(via i-do-not-fangirl-i-fanwoman)

"'I wonder who invented coffee?' she said
“God, I should think.”
‘…Do you believe in God?’
..I do not believe in God before nine o’clock in the morning."

— from “Pilgrim” by Thomas Findley, pg. 116 (via baptismus-flaminis)

(Source: serpentedefe)

just-writer-problems:

Requested by Anonymous.

just-writer-problems:

Requested by Anonymous.

theghostofpoetryfuture:

http://wp.me/p1GPHv-11N
libraryreads:

(via SharedWorlds)
This is Lev Grossman’s advice to writers, written on his hand. You should probably put a hold on The Magician’s Land, which is on the August 2014 LibraryReads list.

libraryreads:

(via SharedWorlds)

This is Lev Grossman’s advice to writers, written on his hand. You should probably put a hold on The Magician’s Land, which is on the August 2014 LibraryReads list.

New desk! :D

It’s not quite finished yet, but I can use it to work on now… I’m sitting at it right this very second, in fact. It’s really nice to have a proper workspace, you have no idea.

The rest of the flat looks like a complete dump, but we’re still redecorating at the moment, so this time next week it’ll be lovely. I’m considering taking a few shelfies now all of my books look so great, stacked up so neatly, but we’ll see. Not really sure how interested anyone would actually be in my low brow collection ;) Not really sure how interested anyone is in my desk either, but there we go!

Wall art by the ever incredible and skilled taijavigilia <3

(Source: writersrelief)

just-writer-problems:

Requested by Anonymous.

just-writer-problems:

Requested by Anonymous.

(Source: booksinside)

writersrelief:

“Show, Don’t Tell”—How To Get It Right
Ah, “Show, don’t tell”—the words conjure up memories of red ink on high school English papers. But for many writers, knowing how to “show” and not “tell” is just as tricky now as it was in freshman year. So, what does it mean exactly?
Academic and technical writers are faced with the task of spelling things out for their audience; their job is to present information as clearly as possible. Their writing is all “tell” and no “show.” But as a creative writer, if you offer nothing but plain and factual details, you’re going to bore readers. Your job is to entertain, to elicit emotion, to activate the right sides of readers’ brains. And this is where showing, rather than telling, comes into play.
In creative writing, to “show” is to present a character trait, plot point, or aspect of setting through thoughts, senses, actions, metaphors, or another literary device. In other words, you don’t want to  tell the reader that a character is a certain way; rather, you want to provide clues for the reader to deduce it on his or her own.

writersrelief:

“Show, Don’t Tell”—How To Get It Right

Ah, “Show, don’t tell”—the words conjure up memories of red ink on high school English papers. But for many writers, knowing how to “show” and not “tell” is just as tricky now as it was in freshman year. So, what does it mean exactly?

Academic and technical writers are faced with the task of spelling things out for their audience; their job is to present information as clearly as possible. Their writing is all “tell” and no “show.” But as a creative writer, if you offer nothing but plain and factual details, you’re going to bore readers. Your job is to entertain, to elicit emotion, to activate the right sides of readers’ brains. And this is where showing, rather than telling, comes into play.

In creative writing, to “show” is to present a character trait, plot point, or aspect of setting through thoughts, senses, actions, metaphors, or another literary device. In other words, you don’t want to tell the reader that a character is a certain way; rather, you want to provide clues for the reader to deduce it on his or her own.